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Excursion to Öland

Last week, the CAnMove staff went on an excursion to beautiful Öland, and returned 24 hours later having spotted 76 bird species!
Bird watching people
Photo: Johan Bäckman

CAnMove is certainly not only about birds, even though there are quite a few people with some knowledge about birds in the programme.
However, for the staff without ornithological background the visit to Öland offered an interesting insight into the research taking place at Ottenby Bird Observatory - as well as into bird watching.

Långa Jan
Långe Jan. Photo: Helena Osvath

The station is beautifully set on Öland's most southern shores, with the light house "Långe Jan" as the most conspicous landmark. Ottenby Bird Observatory was founded in 1946, at the same time as the Swedish Ornitholocial Society, but bird research has been conducted at Ottenby ever since the 19th century.

Robin caught in a mist net at Ottenby
Photo: Helena Osvath

Our group met with Joakim Granholm, responsible for the ringing scheme at Ottenby, who gave us an interesting presentation of the daily ringing procedures at the station. Here, with a robin caught in a mist net.


Common treecreeper
The caught birds are ringed, measured and then quickly released again. Here, a common treecreeper. Photo: Helena Osvath

Ringar
The smallest and the biggest ring. Photo: Helena Osvath

The bird spotting started as soon as we left the mainland, and for an untrained birder the number of species is a bit overwhelming. During 24 hours, we managed to spot no less than 76 species of birds, of which the Pallas' leaf warbler and the Jack snipe seemed to attract most interest from fellow birders.

Goldcrest.
Goldcrest. Photo Johan Bäckman

Leaf warbler
An elusive Leaf warbler hiding from its numerous human admirers. Photo: Johan Bäckman

A sleeping Jack snipe.
A sleeping Jack snipe. Photo: Johan Bäckman

The landscape on Öland is truly beautiful and it is easy to understand why this little island attracts so many visitors. I think we all returned home both inspired and content.

Bird watching people
Photo: Christina Rengefors

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Centre for Animal Movement Research
Evolutionary Ecology, Department of Biology
Ecology building S-223 62 Lund Sweden