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New paper on insect flight

Kajsa Warfvinge, Marco Klein Heerenbrink and Anders Hedenström recently published a paper in the Journal of Royal Society Interface, investigating the aerodynamic power of two free-flying hawkmoths in the windtunnel.
Hawkmoth

For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. At this speed, they are the most efficient and consume the least amount of energy. Corresponding phenomena have previously been demonstrated in birds, but never among insects. Read more at: biology.lu.se!

Abstract:
A flying animal can minimize its energy consumption by choosing an optimal flight speed depending on the task at hand. Choice of flight speed can be predicted by modelling the aerodynamic power required for flight, and this tool has previously been used extensively in bird migration research. For insects, however, it is uncertain whether any of the commonly used power models are useful, as insects often operate in a very different flow regime from vertebrates. To investigate this, we measured aerodynamic power in the wake of two Manduca sexta flying freely in a wind tunnel at 1–3.8 ms−1, using tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV). The expended power was similar in magnitude to that predicted by two classic models. However, the most ubiquitously used model, originally intended for vertebrates, failed to predict the sharp increase in power at higher speeds, leading to an overestimate of predicted flight speed during longer flights. In addition to measuring aerodynamic power, the tomo-PIV system yielded a highly detailed visualization of the wake, which proved to be significantly more intricate than could be inferred from previous smoke trail- and two-dimensional-PIV studies.

To the paper: "The power–speed relationship is U-shaped in two free-flying hawkmoths (Manduca sexta)"

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Centre for Animal Movement Research
Evolutionary Ecology, Department of Biology
Ecology building S-223 62 Lund Sweden