Menu

Javascript is not activated in your browser. This website needs javascript activated to work properly.
You are here

Computer Vision Workshop

On November 8th-9th 2016, CAnMove hosted the Workshop Identifying Mutual Interests in Computer Vision and Animal Movement Research at Lund University. A crowd of 45 motivated participants from different universites in Scandinavia discussed several state of the art computer vision methodology and their use as analytical tool to study animal behavior and morphology. Overall it was a very informative and stimulating workshop, which brought together different domain of research questions in the area of computer vision and animal ecology.
People attending a workshop
Photo: Sylvie Tesson

People attending a workshop
Photo: Sylvie Tesson

Discussions took place formally in the auditorium and continued more informally during the pizza evening and other side events. The participants also visited four of the CAnMove facilities that uses computer vision methods (MagnetoreceptionLab, Wind tunnel, NanoLAB, LUMBO), participated in the thermal cameras demo by Axis Communication and visit the IKDC 3D-printing facility at Lund University Design Center.

People attending a workshop
The MagnetoreceptionLab. Photo: Sylvie Tesson

We were particularly pleased to see 10 submissions to the Animation Competition. The quality of the animations was so high that has been difficult to decide which was the best. The prize was awarded to Atticus Pinzón-Rodríguez that presented an animation with the title “Tracking the orientation behavior of zebra finches under controlled light and magnetic conditions”.

People attending a workshop
Photo: Sylvie Tesson

We are facing a fast technological development in terms of 3D shape analysis and many of the new techniques have huge potentials in animal studies. 3D shape technologies are already used to study the shape of deforming wings in birds and bats (Christoffer Johansson), to the study of phenotypic variation (Erik Svensson) or animal brain morphology (Alexander Kotrschal). However, 3D-scanning techniques offer great opportunities, but also many challenges in terms of post processing and data analysis (Stefan Lindgren).

Tracking is one of the most common application of computer vision and widely used in animal behavior studies. However, tracking is never a trivial task especially when diverse animals are studied (Rachel Muheim). Complexity in tracking algorithms need state of the art calibration techniques (Tobias Palmér), the use of appropriate motion models (Clas Veibäck) and even newly implemented sensors setups (Samuel Jansson).

We learnt about the most recent achievements in the field of computer vision and how such new approaches will be used in the future in farming (Mikael Nilsson) or clinical analysis (Rasmus R. Paulsen). However, the field of image analysis is constantly improving opening up new possibilities (Michael Felsberg) that can also be integrated, and sometimes replaced, by different tools including radio and audio signals (Kalle Åström).

People attending a workshop
Photo: Sylvie Tesson

Finally, during the open discussion, we tried to identified the mutual interests among researchers in computer vision and animal behavior and morphology. We agreed on the future steps to take to facilitate the collaboration between departments and universities and investigated grant applications strategies to build on fruitful collaboration.

We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for their active contribution and all delegates who helped us during the event. See you at the next meeting with new interesting collaborative results!

 

/The organization committee,

Christoffer Johansson, Giuseppe Bianco and Christina Rengefors

Text: Giuseppe Bianco/Photo: Sylvie Tesson

Scanning for 3D-printing
3D-scanning. Photo: Sylvie Tesson

3D scanning
3D-scanning. Photo: Sylvie Tesson

3D-printed hand
3D-scanned arm prosthesis. Photo: Sylvie Tesson

People attending a workshop
At the 3Dscanning-facility. Photo: Sylvie Tesson

Atticus
Winner of Animation competition. Photo: Sylvie Tesson

 

Latest articles

30/11/2017
Flight speed adjustments in waders
Flight speed adjustments in waders
30/11/2017
Collaborative work on the monitoring of aerofauna
Collaborative work on the monitoring of aerofauna
15/11/2017
Ear size matters
Ear size matters
06/11/2017
The Animal Migration course 2017
The Animal Migration course 2017
02/11/2017
VR grants to CAnMove PIs
VR grants to CAnMove PIs

Centre for Animal Movement Research
Evolutionary Ecology, Department of Biology
Ecology building S-223 62 Lund Sweden