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Remote sensing of birds and insects

New paper on electro-optic methods that help us understand more about birds and insects in the atmoshere.
lidar

In recent years, the field of remote sensing of birds and insects in the atmosphere has advanced considerably, and modern electro-optic methods now allow the assessment of the abundance and fluxes of pests and beneficials on a landscape scale. These techniques have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of, and ability to quantify and manage, the ecological environment. In a newly published paper in PLOS one, CAnMove collaborator Mikkel Brydegaard presents a concept whereby laser radar observations of atmospheric fauna can be parameterized and table values for absolute cross sections can be catalogued to allow for the inter-comparison in laser radar studies of focal species such as disease vectors and pests.

To the paper: Towards Quantitative Optical Cross Sections in Entomological Laser Radar – Potential of Temporal and Spherical Parameterizations for Identifying Atmospheric Fauna.

Researchers in Lund have developed an lidar which samples the atmosphere so fast that it can resolve wing beats and overtones of oscillating organisms. The figure shows the worlds fastest atmospheric lidar time-range map. When aerofauna intercepts the probe volume several frequency components appear in the atmospheric backscatter coefficient. The slow atmospheric turbulence is seen as waves towards the low frequencies.

 

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Centre for Animal Movement Research
Evolutionary Ecology, Department of Biology
Ecology building S-223 62 Lund Sweden